In 1995, Classical Movements became the first American company to tour Croatia. Despite having just undergone four years of war, the country remained a beautiful destination with historical sites as well as simultaneously verdant, mountainous and coastal landscapes. With postwar revitalization and rebuilding efforts still underway, the “Dubrovnik and the Dalmatian Coast” tour was planned and executed: It garnered rave reviews from clients and press alike and demonstrated the company’s foresight to work with unconventional destinations to provide a unique tour.

Since then, Classical Movements has organized several tours to Croatia, including The Oregon Repertory Singers, College of William and Mary Chamber Singers and Smith College Choir amongst others both on its own and bundled with nearby countries such as Italy, Austria and Slovenia.

🇭🇷 Sights & Sounds 🇭🇷

  • Theaters and palaces in historical Dubrovnik
  • 1,200 Forested islands
  • Stunning beaches
  • Ancient Roman complex of Split and Diocletian’s Palace
  • Illyrian Music
  • Euphrasian Basilica
  • Gothic Architecture in Hvar
  • Waterfalls and gorges in Krka National Park
  • Museums and festivals in Zagreb
  • Zagreb, Pula, Opatija

Testimonials

Before war broke out in 1991 and destroyed a flourishing tourism business, Croatia was a popular place to go. Dubrovnik, Split and Korcula were familiar ports of call for cruise ships, and Croatian areas of Yugoslavia received between six million and eight million visitors annually. In January 1996 the United States State Department lifted its warning against travel there… Some tour companies with offices in the United States are again offering trips there. Among them are these: Blue Heart Tours, in Washington, put Croatia on its itinerary last year. Starting in May, a new six-night tour will include stays in Dubrovnik, Split and on the islands of Korcula and Hvar.

-New York Times, February 23, 1997

[Bosnia], known for its medieval cities and cobblestone streets, has been significantly rebuilt.  [Neeta] Helms said Croatia has plenty to offer Americans. ‘It is very much coastal, semi-Mediterranean, since it is north of what you call traditional Mediterranean,’ she said. ‘Even though we are going along the Adriatic, it is not a beach experience. It has some very old and historic towns. It is very cultural. It is like doing classical Greece with antiquities.

-Tour and Travel News-Michael Milligan

 

Press

“Before war broke out in 1991 and destroyed a flourishing tourism business, Croatia was a popular place to go. Dubrovnik, Split and Korcula were familiar ports of call for cruise ships, and Croatian areas of Yugoslavia received between six million and eight million visitors annually. In January 1996 the United States State Department lifted its warning against travel there… Some tour companies with offices in the United States are again offering trips there. Among them are these: Blue Heart Tours, in Washington, put Croatia on its itinerary last year. Starting in May, a new six-night tour will include stays in Dubrovnik, Split and on the islands of Korcula and Hvar.”

-New York Times, February 23, 1997

 

“[Bosnia], known for its medieval cities and cobblestone streets, has been significantly rebuilt.  [Neeta] Helms said Croatia has plenty to offer Americans. ‘It is very much coastal, semi-Mediterranean, since it is north of what you call traditional Mediterranean,’ she said. ‘Even though we are going along the Adriatic, it is not a beach experience. It has some very old and historic towns. It is very cultural. It is like doing classical Greece with antiquities.’”

-Tour and Travel News, Michael Milligan

 

“Before war broke out in 1991 and destroyed a flourishing tourism business, Croatia was a popular place to go. Dubrovnik, Split and Korcula were familiar ports of call for cruise ships, and Croatian areas of Yugoslavia received between six million and eight million visitors annually. In January 1996 the United States State Department lifted its warning against travel there… Some tour companies with offices in the United States are again offering trips there. Among them are these: Blue Heart Tours, in Washington, put Croatia on its itinerary last year. Starting in May, a new six-night tour will include stays in Dubrovnik, Split and on the islands of Korcula and Hvar.”

-New York Times, February 23, 1997

 

“[Bosnia], known for its medieval cities and cobblestone streets, has been significantly rebuilt.  [Neeta] Helms said Croatia has plenty to offer Americans. ‘It is very much coastal, semi-Mediterranean, since it is north of what you call traditional Mediterranean,’ she said. ‘Even though we are going along the Adriatic, it is not a beach experience. It has some very old and historic towns. It is very cultural. It is like doing classical Greece with antiquities.’”

-Tour and Travel News, Michael Milligan